A post on food!

I know you are all curious about the food here. We have eaten Mongolian food for ten days now and are still alive, even though we are happy we brought some of our own food.

First of all, you can not drink water from the pipes here, which means either buying bottled water – which we never do in Europe – or boiling it, waiting for it to cool down and only then drink it. We were extra careful, even brushing our teeth with drinking water from the bottle, but keeping hydrated was not easy. I think the most critical point was the second aid station during the race: we had been told that there would be drinking water at each aid station (and mind you, there were only three over the 42 k course), but they only had boiling hot water at the 24 k aid station, which meant we couldn’t drink or refill our bottles. Luckily we still had most of the water we had carried from the beginning.

The food we had in UB was good. The first night we tried a Mongolian grill restaurant, where we picked our veggies, meat and noodles and brought it to the chefs for them to sauté it. The second night we had my favourite meal so far: we decided to be brave and give a try to a wonderful street food stand where we were given huge beef skewers with pieces of fat in between the chunks of meat. The end of the world.

At the camp we alternated between the food we had brought from home (dried meat, parmesan, crackers, tunafish and ready-to-eat rice salads with tuna and veggies, biscuits, chocolate and nuts) and the local food. Breakfast was usually one egg plus two slices of some sort of sausage (which we tried the first day and decided to avoid, as they were impossible to digest), and some sweet fried bread (boortsog), but sometimes we complemented with bread peanut butter and jam. On race day I stuck to my typical pre-race breakfast (banana + peanut butter), as I really wanted to avoid tummy issues as much as possible. Lunch was always some kind of soup + one sandwich. The soup was usually very unappealing, as it was some kind of broth with floating, unknown vegetables in it. Eating sandwiches every day for a week is tough too, especially when you are getting ready for a trail marathon and are trying to get all the nutrients you need, so we were once again grateful that we had brought food that we knew would sit well in our tummies. The dinners were always the same: beef stew or minced meat with rice or pasta and stewed vegetables. At the end of the week we were a bit tired of that as well, but we enjoyed the last dinner we had at the camp. It was a traditional Mongolian buffet dinner and we had sooooo much food. It wasn’t much different from what we had been eating all week, but we could have as much as we wanted, and we made the most of it.

Yesterday we had the final dinner in a typical Mongolian restaurant in UB, where we had some of the local delicacies, which unfortunately tend to always feature mutton meat (which I can’t eat). We had steamed dumplings (buuz) and fried ones (khuushuur), and khorkhog, which features a stew with sheep bits (head included) and veggies that are put in a huge pot with hot stones for a long time. I had beef tsuivan noodles, and they were undoubtedly the best noodles I have had in a long time. We were also served fresh salads and steamed and roasted vegetables, which we enjoyed very much. They brought us way too much food, so we asked to pack some and we had leftovers for lunch today. It was still good, even if re-heated, but I must say everything is quite fatty and fried, and definitely not the easiest food to digest.

We have also tried some local chocolate!

In a nutshell, if you are interested in Mongolian food, expect plenty of meat loooooots of mutton and no chicken whatsoever – and fried dumplings. Vegetarians might have a hard time in Mongolia, but we have been told UB has several excellent vegan restaurants.

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